2021 American Sailing Outstanding Instructors

By: American Sailing Association, Instructors

ASA has selected the Outstanding Instructors of the Year for 2021. This Award honors the top 1% percent of all active status ASA Instructors as determined by Instructor Surveys that are submitted by their students. Of the 2332 Instructors in 2021 who had active status, 956 taught at least one ASA class and thereby became eligible for this ASA Award. The top 25 are listed below representing 24 cities across 10 states and 3 countries. The process by which the Outstanding Instructors were determined is algorithmic, derived by the number of surveys sent (one survey for each class taught), the …

ASA Way to Foretell a Lowering Sky

By: Sailing Tips, Weather

“When in evening, say ye, ‘Fair weather, for the heaven is red’. And if in morning, say, ‘Today will storm, for the sky is red and lowering’.” – The Book of Matthew 16:2-3 In late winter and spring precipitation begins its transition from snow to rain. As rain clouds form, they become thicker and lower in the sky, usually as a warm front approaching from the west climbs on top of an existing cool air mass. Eventually, the clouds turn blue-gray or heavy gray in color. This process of cloud condensation, with varying success, has been predicted ahead of time …

Sailing Inspiration: Puget Sound Sailing Institute

By: Instructors, Schools, Testimonials

ASA Kudos to Mike Rice of Puget Sound Sailing Institute New ASA sailor Angela Baune has spent most of her 57 years in landlocked cities, and in 2017 she was involved in an accident that left her mentally and physically broken. “My brain doesn’t process information as fast as it used to and it takes a lot of repetition to commit things to memory,” explains Angela. In 2021 she and her husband moved to the Seattle area. “I am new to the water, but I was immediately attracted to its beauty.” It wasn’t long until Angela and her husband, Donald, …

ASA at the 2021 U.S. Sailboat Show in Annapolis

By: American Sailing Association

Annapolis. When one thinks of classic yachting epicenters on the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, just a handful of places come to mind. One of them is beautiful, historic Annapolis, Maryland, known as “America’s Sailing Capital”. The 51st annual United States Sailboat Show was held there 14-18 Oct 2021 and ASA had a large, splashy presence. The 157-foot, three-masted schooner Arabella, easily the largest vessel in this year’s Show, served as ASA’s “booth” and base of operations. Despite a couple of days of high winds and a line of squalls, just over 5000 people braved the weather and made …

ASA Sailor Saves a Woman Adrift Off Los Angeles

By: Sailing Story, Schools

Most of the time, when a sailing skipper rescues someone from the water, it’s one of the crew who fell overboard, and it’s usually a man (85%), but not this time. ASA Student Khosrow Khosravani, with three friends. embarked upon the maiden sail of Khosrow’s Catalina 25 Defiant on the morning of Sun 26 Sep 2021 out of Marina del Rey, CA. Their plan was to head up the coast to Paradise Cove, off Malibu, and swim ashore for lunch. An hour into their trip, under an overcast sky upon a bluish-gray sea, Khosrow was motor-sailing when his eye caught …

ASA Remembers Laser Designer Bruce Kirby

By: American Sailing Association

Following in the wake of the death of Frank Butler, President and Chief Executive Officer of Catalina Yachts, in Nov 2020 at age 92, boat designer and three-time Olympian Bruce Kirby, best known globally as the designer of the Laser 14 Olympic sailing dinghy, passed away at his home in Connecticut on 19 Jul 2021, also at age 92. In 1969, at the request of a friend calling from Montreal to design a “car-topper” sailboat, Kirby sketched a preliminary design for the Laser while still on the telephone with boat builder and fellow Canadian Ian Bruce. Kirby kept that faded …

Should ASA Instructors (and Skippers in General) Be Good Swimmers?

By: Instructors, Learn To Sail, Sailing Tips

Should You Know How to Swim to Learn to Sail? For sailors who grew up perpetually wet from ages 5 to 25, having fun righting capsized dinghies, less fun while righting turtled ones, and trapeze sailing small boats competitively in school and college, this question might seem to be axiomatic. Yet, there have been some very accomplished sailing skippers who cannot swim. Three-time America’s Cup winner, two-time Star Class World Champion, and Olympic Bronze Medalist Tempest Class sailor Dennis Conner cannot swim. British Royal Navy explorer, navigator, and cartographer Captain James Cook, who sailed thousands of miles across uncharted areas …