Elements Quiz

Elements Quiz

We talk a lot about boats, their related systems and the techniques to use them to sail the best we can. However, it’s also very important to have a solid understanding of the elements we all find ourselves in whenever we untie and cast off. Take a crack at this quiz that focuses on just that – tides, fog, currents… that kind of stuff. This quiz is created from the information found in ASA’s 104 Bareboat Cruising Made Easy textbook. Good luck!

  • When cold air flows over warm water, what is produced?
    1. Radiation fog Incorrect – this usually forms over land
    2. Sea/Advection fog Nope – This is actually the opposite of steam fog
    3. Steam fog Correct
    4. Vale fog We made this up
  • What are Trade Winds?
    1. Inconsistent breezes, usually in the four to seven-knot range that you wish you could “trade” for more breeze. That is not right, that’s just a crummy day.
    2. Winds over 35-knots that would torture sailors on trade routes in the 1800s. Not correct, give it another shot.
    3. Any consistent wind event that occurred along popular trade routes of the Atlantic Ocean. No, but not a terrible guess.
    4. Consistent open-ocean 15-knot breezes that occur in the tropics and sub tropics. Sailing ships used them to ply their trade. Yes!
  • At what point will a gale warning be issued?
    1. For forecasted winds of 20-knots sustained. That won’t do it.
    2. For forecasted winds of 22-28-knots sustained. Nope – not quite a gale, but probably an intense day!
    3. For forecasted winds of 34-47-knots sustained. You got it!
    4. For forecasted winds of 52-60-knots sustained. No – that’s more than a gale my friend!
  • The period when a tidal current is neither ebbing or flooding is called:
    1. Axis tide. If there is such a thing, we don’t know it.
    2. Slack water. Bingo!
    3. Lunar tide. Nope, sounds right but it is not.
    4. Balanced tide. Makes sense but not right
  • What does a “sea breeze” commonly do?
    1. A “sea breeze” usually blows offshore at no less than 20-knots. That would be wrong…
    2. A “sea breeze” will always blow from the north, then revolve to the south. Not a sea breeze, try again.
    3. A “sea breeze” will usually blow onshore from the same general direction. That is right!
    4. A “sea breeze” will always blow across the prevailing current. That does not a sea breeze make!
Click on an answer above to start!
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